Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

CBT is based on the Cognitive Model of Emotional Response.

Cognitive-behavioural therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts cause our feelings and behaviours, not external things, like people, situations, and events. The benefit of CBT is that we can change the way we think and feel, and act differently even if the situation hasn’t changed.

Cognitive-behavioural therapists seek to learn what their clients want out of life (their goals) and then help their clients achieve those goals. The therapist's role is to listen, teach, and encourage, while the client's roles is to express concerns, learn, and implement that learning. Most forms of therapy assume that the main reason people get better in therapy is because of the positive relationship between the therapist and client. Cognitive-behavioural therapists believe it is important to have a good, trusting relationship, but that is not enough. CBT therapists believe that the clients change because they learn how to think differently and they act on that learning. Therefore, CBT therapists focus on teaching rational self-counselling.

Cognitive-behavioural therapy does not tell people how they should feel. However, most people seeking therapy do not want to feel they way they have been feeling. They also emphasize the fact that we have our undesirable situations whether we are upset about them or not. If we are upset about our problems, we have two problems - the problem, and our upset about it. Most people want to have the fewest number of problems possible. So when we learn how to accept a personal problem more calmly, not only do we feel better, but we usually put ourselves in a better position to make use of our intelligence, knowledge, energy, and resources to resolve the problem.